Suboxone

Opoid dependence is epidemic, and deadlier than it has ever been. Street drugs are stronger and more unpredictable; the emergence of fentanyl in the drug supply has led to a startling number of opioid overdose deaths in recent years. At this point, there is good sense in “harm reduction” approaches to addiction.

For many people suffering with substance use disorders, including heroin addiction, prescription drug abuse, and dependency on oxycodone or other opioids, withdrawal can be difficult and frightening. Getting stabilized on a steady dose of suboxone may buy time to build the kind of community infrastructure and emotional preparation that will prepare someone for success with full detox and a life free of any kind of substance dependence.

But getting to safety is not the same as getting to freedom.

There are some people in the conversation about addiction who believe that recovery is not possible for opiate addicts – especially those with a long relapse history. There is a vocal minority in the treatment community who believe that the best way to treat addiction is to keep people permanently medicated with some sort of replacement.
We respectfully disagree.

At Turning Point we know that recovery is possible. We also know that when recovery is unlikely, cyclical withdrawal and relapse can increase the chance of overdose. We will not hesitate to refer a client to a suboxone program when they need to buy some time and build some skills before taking the next step.

When someone is ready for that next step –  getting clean altogether, finding a suboxone program that’s right for them, or coming off the DRT and finding a new way to live — Turning Point and Focused Recovery is here.

Helping people find the right tools for the right time is what our admissions team does best. Give us a call.